I have included a recent article on the recent ban on use of amalgam filling sin Norway.This is part of the reason I have not placed any mercury filled filling in the past 9 years. The American Dental Association has issued a very mild endorsement of these type fillings. It is my belief that this is more a financial driven response rather than the overall well being of the general public. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

Norway announces mercury ban
Posted Jan. 21, 2008

By Craig Palmer

Oslo, Norway—Claiming an international lead in environmental policy, the government of Norway banned the use of mercury in products and most uses of dental amalgam. The ban is valid from Jan. 1.

The minister of the environment and international development announced the ban and rationale at the government’s Web site Dec. 21, 2007. An English translation is posted at www.regjeringen.no/en/dep/md/Press-Centre/Press-releases/2007/Bans-mercury-in-products. html?id=495138 Link opens in separate window. Pop-up Blocker may need to be disabled..

“The justification for the ban is the risk that mercury from products may constitute when in the environment,” the ministry said in a press release accompanied by a policy statement (also available in English) amending regulations that restrict “the use of chemicals and other products hazardous to health and the environment.”

The ban as translated permits limited use of dental amalgam through Dec. 31, 2010, “for dental treatment of patients who must be treated under general anesthesia or who are allergic to ingredients in other dental fillings.” There are other exceptions as well. For example, the ban does not cover thimerosal as a preservative in vaccines or naturally occurring mercury. But in general, under the regulation for mercury and mercury compounds as amended:

* It is prohibited to produce, import, export, sell and use substances on their own or preparations that contain mercury or mercury compounds.
* It is prohibited to produce, import, export and sell articles that contain mercury or mercury compounds.

“The justification for the ban is the risk that mercury from products may constitute when in the environment,” said the minister of the environment and international development, Erik Solheim. “It is therefore important to stop all use of mercury as far as possible.

“Most mercury released to the environment in Norway comes from sources elsewhere in the world. Norway works actively towards stronger international regulations for mercury, both in the EU (European Union) and globally,” the government said. “The Norwegian ban shows that we are taking responsibility at home. It is an important signal to the EU and other countries that there are satisfactory alternatives to mercury.”

Norway is not a member of the European Union.

Stay Connected
Archives